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Posts Tagged ‘Retirement’

Are you ready to give up your home for a smaller place to live? Do you long to move to the city so you can walk to all those places you love to spend your time now that you have plenty of it? Are you ready for less stuff to dust? Are you overwhelmed by a lifetime of belongings that seem to be possessing you rather than the other way around? Are you faced with a spouse that resists giving up his garden, his barcalounger, and a gazillion slides that no one wants to look at again?

Well, a lot of us ElderChicks would like to deal with these issues. But the dreaded thought of downsizing is usually enough to send us to the couch with a case of extreme vapors. (more…)

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Broaden your outlook as you grow older. Go climb a tree.  Experience a new viewpoint.  When I turned age 60, we lived in Africa.  I climbed high up a marula tree and had a photo taken.  I then sent it to my children with the promise that every 10 years, I would again climb a tree.  When I became 70, I climbed a tree back home in Bluffton, Ohio. It was not quite as high as the African tree, but again, I had my photo taken for the family.  At age 80, we were visiting a friend on a lake in Michigan. I climbed a tree outside their cabin. Well, anyway, I stepped about a foot and a half off the ground into a fork in one of their trees, hung on with each arm around one of the trunks, smiled, and my husband took a photo.  Now at age 90, I went out to a tree near my Maple Crest retirement apartment. It was about 3 feet high, given to me by the Medical College of Ohio in thanks for the donation of my deceased husband’s body.  With the help of the arms on my walker, I stood up and, you guessed it.  I lifted one foot and put it ON the tree, fulfilling my promise to “climb” a tree every 10 years. My daughter, Greta, took the picture.  When I turn 100 years of age? Maybe I will be planted UNDER a tree. (more…)

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I’ve always marched to my own drummer, and at the ripe old age of 13 had decided my life’s goal was to work hard and save my money until I was 30, then “take my retirement out of the middle”….retire for 10 years, then go back to work until I died.  Thirty was, of course, a completely unrealistic age, but after a 20+ year crazy, hectic career as a municipal bond trader and underwriter, at 43 years old I did just that.  I retired.

I had bought and renovated a neglected little row house with 3 tiny apartments in it on a couple years earlier with the hope that it would help to supplement the savings I planned to live off of during my retirement years.  I didn’t anticipate that the majority of my renters would be University of the Arts students who would move every year and who, quite frankly, could accomplish no greater domestic task than changing a light bulb, and I frequently even get calls with questions about those “complicated” energy savings bulbs. (more…)

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My Aunt Lil and her husband George were Life Master Bridge players who pleaded with me to learn to play the game and I, being the busy wife playing house and raising three children, had no desire to learn Bridge. Years after my aunt and uncle passed away and I retired from my job as an employment counselor placing people in permanent office positions, I decided to learn to play Bridge. I have never played cards, with the exception of War and Fish with my grandchildren. So I started taking lessons about six years ago and realized that I would have to take lessons (and repeat them) for the rest of my life.  If I live a very long life, I may learn to play the game properly. It’s a wonderful game, stimulating and fun, unless you play with grouchy, cruel, people who never smile. My husband and I argue often (I say “black” and he says “white”), but he doesn’t play Bridge. Probably that’s why we continue to be happy together after fifty-three years. The good thing about Bridge is that I never trip or fall when I play. But that’s another story. (more…)

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